The Halfway Point ~ Windows

After what seems a very long time, (because it was a very long time), all six window sashes have been cut and fitted, with rabbets for the glass routered. The remaining window panes have been ordered and one sash has even been stained and glazed. Progress is being made, even if in apparent slow motion. Except the funny thing is that these windows weren’t actually all that difficult and weren’t all that time-consuming to make. In fact, if one took out all the times they were sidelined, I think it would equate to approximately one month of work, beginning to end. Yet, I am my own worst enemy and to those of you out there who have ever enquired after my progress, you may justly suppose that I have been working on them for half a decade.

You see, for quite a while it was the task that I would prattle off every time a well-meaning family, friend or work colleague would ask ‘Fiona, how is that charming tiny house of your’s going? Nearly finished?’ ‘Ah, well actually, I am just about to build the windows! Isn’t that wretchedly exciting?’For there is no denying that this sounds far more impressive than ‘Uh, um, alright? Yeaaaa I’m afraid the house is not nearly finished… and well uh no, we haven’t started the frame yet.’However, like most aspects of this project, the windows were postponed and delayed and unavoidably made me a liar. For me to only now declare ‘Family! Friends! Let’s rejoice for the windows are half way done!’would reasonably give any of these individuals pause as they mentally do the math and conclude that they must have misheard,’Silly me, I thought she said she was building a tiny house, but she must have said SKYSCRAPER! Yes, I see now, those bad boys do have a fair few windows, what a champ!’Happily no one, bar myself and probably my parents, truly gives two hoots if I take the entire century to build this thing. No doubt social conversation would probably become a little dry as I reached the 30th year, but the plumbing scheduled for year 32 could only lead to the most dazzling of discussions.

Yet for now, I am content that the windows are finally tangible and yesterday I had a good play, testing locations and heights. With each confirmed measurement, the blurred vision that is my house, becomes a little clearer, revealing new details, like the location of a reading lamp, (important for power plans), or the height and design of the desk. It is all well and good to have a Sketch-up drawing but it is nothing like shaping the spaces with the real deal.

When I began planning these windows, the reading and viewing material available was limited, and though I would never argue that my sashes are on level with professionally built ones, I plan to soon share a detailing my process thus far for inspiration or reference. They have been, for most of the time, a pleasure to make, and I do believe they have saved me in both cost and weight, though at the risk of boiling or freezing to death due to a lack of insulated glass? Who knows. But I am getting ahead of myself, glazing is not scheduled until 2024.

After what seems a very long time, (because it was a very long time), all six window sashes have been cut and fitted, with rabbets for the glass routered. The remaining window panes have been ordered and one sash has even been stained and glazed. Progress is being made, even if in apparent slow motion. Except the funny thing is that these windows weren’t actually all that difficult and weren’t all that time-consuming to make. In fact, if one took out all the times they were sidelined, I think it would equate to approximately one month of work, beginning to end. Yet, I am my own worst enemy and to those of you out there who have ever enquired after my progress, you may justly suppose that I have been working on them for half a decade.

You see, for quite a while it was the task that I would prattle off every time a well-meaning family, friend or work colleague would ask ‘Fiona, how is that charming tiny house of your’s going? Nearly finished?’  ‘Ah, well actually, I am just about to build the windows! Isn’t that wretchedly exciting?’ For there is no denying that this sounds far more impressive than ‘Uh, um, alright? Yeaaaa I’m afraid the house is not nearly finished… and well uh no, we haven’t started the frame yet.’ However, like most aspects of this project, the windows were postponed and delayed and unavoidably made me a liar. For me to only now declare ‘Family! Friends! Let’s rejoice for the windows are half way done!’ would reasonably give any of these individuals pause as they mentally do the math and conclude that they must have misheard, ‘Silly me, I thought she said she was building a tiny house, but she must have said SKYSCRAPER! Yes, I see now, those bad boys do have a fair few windows, what a champ!’ Happily no one, bar myself and probably my parents, truly gives two hoots if I take the entire century to build this thing. No doubt social conversation would probably become a little dry as I reached the 30th year, but the plumbing scheduled for year 32 could only lead to the most dazzling of discussions.

Yet for now, I am content that the windows are finally tangible and yesterday I had a good play, testing locations and heights. With each confirmed measurement, the blurred vision that is my house, becomes a little clearer, revealing new details, like the location of a reading lamp, (important for power plans), or the height and design of the desk. It is all well and good to have a Sketch-up drawing but it is nothing like shaping the spaces with the real deal.

When I began planning these windows, the reading and viewing material available was limited, and though I would never argue that my sashes are on level with professionally built ones, I plan to soon share a detailing my process thus far for inspiration or reference. They have been, for most of the time, a pleasure to make, and I do believe they have saved me in both cost and weight, though at the risk of boiling or freezing to death due to a lack of insulated glass? Who knows. But I am getting ahead of myself, glazing is not scheduled until 2024.

 

Six Windows
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The bottom right corner window was treated as my mockup and so has been victim of some maybe-too-orange stain. I glazed it with 4mm glass pretty successfully, though the drying time of the putty bordered on four weeks and there was a minor incident involving a leaking shed roof. It goes without saying that this window is far from perfect, but it has been relegated to the bathroom at the end of the house so the poor putty job shouldn't be too noticeable. 
Windows in place
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It's difficult to see, but there is a faint purple chalk line marking out the borders of the house. Clockwise from the bottom: Bathroom casement / Double casement above kitchen prep counter / Single casement above the desk. An awning window above the couch and another awning above the kitchen sink. 
Double Casement
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This is a pairing of two windows, which sit along the front wall of the house, above the kitchen counter. I am quite excited for these two, as I think they will present a lovely view.
Bathroom Window
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The bathroom window is rather oversized as I ended up with a free pane of glass when I ordered the pane for the desk window. I had ordered raw edges, but they had polished them, and so cut a secondary piece when the mistake had been realised. When I came to collect the sheet, they offered me the spare free of charge. Naturally, I didn't refuse. This did mean that one of the windows had to be resized to fit the glass, and initially, I was thinking the lounge one. However, this one I wanted to be landscape, and the dimensions of the pane were too squat for such orientation. It was suggested for the bathroom but I was hesitant about the lack of privacy a large window may present. That said the other windows had already been cut and I didn't want to waste the sheet. I tested it with greater height, but it looked bizarre and threatened to hit the roof line. I then remembered a tiny house I had once visited, with a window that expanded the back wall, shelved with indoor plants. I placed a few plants on the sill and was impressed with the effect. With an extended window sill, such large plants could certainly provide something of a screen. 
Lounge WindowBELOW
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This will actually be more in line with the left end,  but I was propping it up with clamps. The height is just about right though. 

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